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Dr. Bruce Molnia photographs recently revealed terrain in Bear Glacier Lake, Kenai Fjords National Park. Bear Glacier is currently undergoing a rapid retreat.
Dr. Bruce Molnia works with Kenai Fjords National Park captain Kevin Murphy to find the precise location where geologists photographed Bear Glacier in 1909.
Dr. Bruce Molnia and OASLC Education Coordinator Jim Pfeiffenberger search for the location where geologists photographed Pederson Glacier in 1909.
Dr. Bruce Molnia photographs Bear Glacier in Kenai Fjords National Park.
An iceberg floats in Bear Glacier lake, Kenai Fjords National Park. Bear Glacier is undergoing a rapid retreat.
An iceberg floats in Bear Glacier lake, Kenai Fjords National Park. Bear Glacier is undergoing a rapid retreat.
Dr. Bruce Molnia near an iceberg in Bear Glacier lake, Kenai Fjords National Park. Bear Glacier is undergoing a rapid retreat.
An iceberg floats in Bear Glacier lake, Kenai Fjords National Park. Bear Glacier is undergoing a rapid retreat.
Iceberg floats in Bear Glacier lake, Kenai Fjords National Park. Bear Glacier is undergoing a rapid retreat.
Dr. Bruce Molnia near Holgate Glacier in Kenai Fjords National Park.
Dr. Bruce Molnia searches for the location where geologists photographed Pederson Glacier in 1909.
Dr. Bruce Molnia takes a GPS reading high on a ridge above Bear Glacier, Kenai Fjords National Park. Recording the GPS coordinates will allow future researchers to find the exact locations where photos were taken.
Dr. Bruce Molnia and his assistant recreate a photo of Holgate Glacier that was originally taken from this rock in 1909.
Dr. Bruce Molnia and his assistant recreate a photo of Holgate Glacier that was originally taken from this rock in 1909.
An unnamed glacier in Holgate Arm has formed a small lake at its terminus as it thins and retreats. The ice cave is a result of meltwater flowing through the glacier.
A jagged jumble of seracs, characteristic of the terminus of Ogive Glacier in Northwestern Lagoon.
Pederson Glacier terminates in a freshwater lake.